January 31, 2008

Baby Was Murdered Before Being Thrown Onto Texas Roadside

GALVESTON, Texas — An autopsy has found that a 3-month-old baby boy was murdered before being thrown onto a Galveston roadside, still strapped into his car seat. The infant's death was ruled a homicide by blunt force head trauma, said John Florence, chief investigator for the Galveston County Medical Examiner's Office.

Police in Texas have identified the biological father of the baby, the last person known to be with the child, and are calling him a person of interest in the infant’s death, according to MyFoxHouston. A search was under way for Travis Mullis, 21, after an Alvin woman, whose name hasn't been released, tentatively identified the body as that of her son. She contacted police on Tuesday, saying she hadn't seen her son since Mullis took him that morning.
A couple who were bird-watching discovered the baby’s body Tuesday afternoon after first mistaking it for a doll.

The couple believed to be the baby's parents had argued the night before the infant was killed, police said Wednesday. Galveston Police spokesman Lt. Jorge Trevino said the couple had been fighting Monday night in their home in Alvin, about 30 miles northwest of Galveston. "I don't know if there was a history of that," he said. By the time the child's father left with his son sometime between 5 a.m. and 5:30 a.m. Tuesday to get a car repaired, the couple was no longer arguing, Trevino said.

The mother began calling hospitals hours later after becoming concerned about the baby because the father had left with few provisions for the child. The boy, wearing only a diaper, ended up in a grassy area Tuesday morning near Seawall Boulevard in this island city about 50 miles southeast of Houston.

A Galveston couple found the body as they drove slowly along a road looking for wildlife. There had been initial reports that the infant might have been thrown out of a moving vehicle. "But the location of the child and the baby seat is not consistent with a moving vehicle," Trevino said. "It was likely the car was stopped." The infant was in the car seat when it was tossed and the child was apparently ejected when the seat hit the ground, Trevino said.

A nationwide search is being conducted for the father, who dyed his hair blonde before the infant's death. The discovery of the baby's body comes just three months after a fisherman found the remains of a 2-year-old girl in a plastic box that had washed ashore in Galveston Bay. That child, dubbed "Baby Grace," was later identified as Riley Ann Sawyers of Spring.
Riley's mother and stepfather are charged with capital murder in her beating death.

Man Killed 8-Year-Old Daughter, Then Himself

Wife Found Bodies Two Hours After Argument, Authorities Say

INDIANAPOLIS -- A man shot and killed his 8-year-old daughter before fatally shooting himself in an east-side Indianapolis house Wednesday afternoon, police said. The bodies of Dwayne Johnson Jr., 28, and his daughter, Jordan Johnson, were found inside the house in the 3900 block of Fletcher Avenue, police said.

Police said the man had argued with his wife, Ginger, in the house at about 3 p.m. Wednesday, and that the wife left. Shortly after 5 p.m., the wife returned with her mother and found the bodies, according to police.

Johnson's wife called 911, and medics and officers who arrived determined the man and the child were dead, police said. Authorities said they believe the man and his daughter were the only ones inside the house when the shootings happened.

Relatives said Johnson and his wife were having marital problems. "I know that they were in the process of starting a divorce, and he didn't want (his wife) to have (their daughter)," Johnson's aunt Donna Allen told 6News' Renee Jameson. "I guess he just couldn't wait until it went through the court systems. He took his way out instead. Police said they had no record of any prior problems at the address where the shootings occurred.

Atherton-Zeman: Patriots - take a stand against domestic violence - Framingham, MA - The MetroWest Daily News

I must admit, with head hung, that as a football fan....I've been out of it this last half of this season and I apparently live under a rock, because I did not know that there were DV charges against Randy Moss?!? HHHMMM...I do like this writers take on it, I urge you to read this and spread it around. There are many things said here, that others....especially men in general need to read and take to heart!

Atherton-Zeman: Patriots - take a stand against domestic violence - Framingham, MA - The MetroWest Daily News

Domestic Violence Expert Accused Of Abusing His Wife

Well, I think the headline speaks for itself! I do hope Dean Tong gets what is coming to him for all the pain and suffering his work has put innocent children through! I'd love to know when his court date is, if anyone finds this information, please leave a comment here so that we will all know! I would like to reach out to his wife at this point.

Domestic Violence Expert Accused Of Abusing His Wife

January 29, 2008

January 28, 2008

Clackamas deputy accused of domestic violence

Every time I read something like this it makes me afraid of the world we live in and what it holds in store for our future generations, if the laws and this good 'ol boys club are not changed. I am saddened by the fact that one day I may have grandchildren and this is what type of world they are being brought into!

I'm sorry I just don't get this: "Phelan asked that in contrast to usual procedure, Hyson be allowed to retain his weapon for his job and his personal protection, and the judge agreed." (Phelan is the the guy's lawyer) However, Hyson was placed on paid admin leave, so WHY IN THE WORLD does he need his weapon for his job.....and well, frankly why can't he just beat someone up to protect himself....I mean come on he apparently had no trouble with abusing his wife!

There are just so so many things wrong with this entire thing....I mean one judge did arrest him, but this judge seems to think there was no need, and then he shows up late to court and well that is just fine and dandy also....I guess that is because he has a "commendable work ethic and record," what a load of crap! Just read the article!

I hope this woman is safe and aware that he is NOT in jail and still has his weapon!

Clackamas deputy accused of domestic violence in Clark County Clackamas County News, Sports and Entertainment - OregonLive.com

January 27, 2008

Diaper Man Avoids Jail

HHHMMM...I'm wondering here why they couldn't lock him up somewhere until the sexual disorder evaluation is complete? And, everyone is always wondering how victims end up dead AFTER court cases are done? HHHMMM....I wonder! I hope that girl is being protected at least by someone and is watchful at least of what is going on and what could happen!

Diaper Man Avoids Jail

January 24, 2008

Mre Shame For SC

Man admits guilt to criminal domestic violence incident at Anderson apartment

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— Anderson Municipal Court Judge Ken Mattison said he would wait before deciding if a payment plan is in order for a 21-year-old Anderson man after he pleaded guilty on Wednesday to criminal domestic violence.

Daniel Collins Dove was ordered to pay a fine of $2,125 or spend 30 days in the Anderson City Jail for his role in a 4:30 p.m. dispute Monday on McConnell Springs Road.

According to the incident report, Mr. Dove struck Amanda Holbrooks, 20, of Central in her face after the couple argued over their child.

According to testimony by Anderson City Police and Ms. Holbrooks, she was dropping off the couple’s 35-month-old son for court-ordered visitation at McConnell Springs Road when Mr. Dove struck her face and hit her vehicle’s window.

Mr. Dove testified that he has “been going through a hard time,” including having to pay child support, switching to a daytime shift at work, coping with prescription medicine and problems from being “mentally stressed out.”

“I just want to work and provide for our son,” he said.

Judge Mattison ordered Mr. Dove to enroll in and complete anger management counseling. But an option for a payment plan would be deferred until Ms. Holbrooks obtains an order of protection, Judge Mattison said.

On Oct. 31, police arrested Mr. Dove at the same location after he reportedly chased his mother, grabbing her by the throat and choking her, according to another incident report.

While Kim Mize, 48, spoke to a 911 operator, Mr. Dove was heard telling his mother that “he was going to cut her throat from ear to ear and that he was going to bash her skull in,” according to the incident report.

More Shame For SC!

1. Man admits guilt to criminal domestic violence incident at Anderson apartment

— Anderson Municipal Court Judge Ken Mattison said he would wait before deciding if a payment plan is in order for a 21-year-old Anderson man after he pleaded guilty on Wednesday to criminal domestic violence.

Daniel Collins Dove was ordered to pay a fine of $2,125 or spend 30 days in the Anderson City Jail for his role in a 4:30 p.m. dispute Monday on McConnell Springs Road.

According to the incident report, Mr. Dove struck Amanda Holbrooks, 20, of Central in her face after the couple argued over their child.

According to testimony by Anderson City Police and Ms. Holbrooks, she was dropping off the couple’s 35-month-old son for court-ordered visitation at McConnell Springs Road when Mr. Dove struck her face and hit her vehicle’s window.

Mr. Dove testified that he has “been going through a hard time,” including having to pay child support, switching to a daytime shift at work, coping with prescription medicine and problems from being “mentally stressed out.”

“I just want to work and provide for our son,” he said.

Judge Mattison ordered Mr. Dove to enroll in and complete anger management counseling. But an option for a payment plan would be deferred until Ms. Holbrooks obtains an order of protection, Judge Mattison said.

On Oct. 31, police arrested Mr. Dove at the same location after he reportedly chased his mother, grabbing her by the throat and choking her, according to another incident report.

While Kim Mize, 48, spoke to a 911 operator, Mr. Dove was heard telling his mother that “he was going to cut her throat from ear to ear and that he was going to bash her skull in,” according to the incident report.


2. Shotgun fired during domestic dispute in Starr

— A Starr man was arrested about 11 p.m. Saturday after a domestic dispute left a hole from a shotgun blast in the couple’s bed.

Scottie Bryant, 32, was charged with criminal domestic violence of a high and aggravated nature, according to the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office.

According to the report, deputies responding to Wesley Court found adults carrying children out of the home.

Once inside, deputies confronted Mr. Bryant, who allegedly was in a dispute with his wife, Laura Bryant, 30.

Mr. Bryant told deputies that a double-barrel .12-gauge shotgun accidentally discharged when a male neighbor tried to keep Mr. Bryant in the bedroom and away from his wife, according to the report.


3. Homicide inside the home

The Post and Courier
Monday, September 24, 2007


'06 slayings spotlight S.C. domestic violence

How to get help

If you or someone you know is being abused and wants help, call one of the following:

--My Sister's House: 744-3242 or 800-273-4673.

--S.C. Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline: 800-260-9293.

--National Domestic Violence Hotline: 800-799-7233.

The victims

In 2005, South Carolina ranked seventh in the United States for the rate of women killed by men.

--43 women were killed by men.

--22 victims were black, and 21 victims were white.

--38 knew their suspected killers.

--30 were wives, common-law wives, ex-wives or girlfriends of the offenders.

--21 women were shot to death; 17 of those were killed with handguns.

--Nine women were slain with knives.

--Five women were killed by bodily force.

--One woman was killed with a blunt object.

With the first anniversary of his family's slaying approaching, Christan Rainey plans to spend some quiet time alone in his Baton Rouge, La., apartment.

On Sept. 30, 2006, his immediate family was gunned down in a North Charleston mobile home. In a sweeping act of violence, Rainey lost his mother, Detra Rainey, and four siblings.

Michael Anthony Simmons, Detra Rainey's husband of one year, awaits trial, charged with five counts of murder.

An overwhelming majority of women slain by men in South Carolina know their killers, according to the latest report from the Violence Policy Center. The

Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit group analyzed 2005 homicide figures and found that all but five of the 43 women slain in South Carolina knew their killers. Thirty were wives, ex-wives or girlfriends of the assailants.

Nationally, black women were killed at a rate nearly three times higher than white women in 2005, according to the study. In South Carolina, 22 of the women killed by men were black, and 21 were white.

Nearly a year has passed since Christan Rainey received the terrible news, and he still struggles to make sense of it.

"You can look at everything from a religious aspect — that everything happened for a reason — but you're still forced to live with it," Rainey said.

"I wish I could have stayed home. Things would have been different," he said. "Michael never tried to disrespect my mom around me. I would not tolerate that."

The state moved down to No. 7 in the U.S. for its rate of women killed by men in 2005, with 1.97 deaths per 100,000 people. South Carolina ranked sixth for three years after it held the ignominious first place spot in 2001.

Vicki Bourus, executive director of the S.C. Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, said, "We're praying this downward trend continues. It's certainly hopeful."

Bourus attributes the drop to a series of policy and legislative changes. A 2005 criminal domestic violence bill increased fines and sentences. Second offenses moved from the magistrate level to general sessions court, and third offenses became felonies with a minimum one-year sentence, up from a misdemeanor charge and minimum 90-day sentence.

Domestic violence courts are opening up across the state. These courts, which are led by judges more educated in domestic violence issues, lead to fewer dropped cases, better referrals to shelters and treatment for the batterers, Bourus said.

Also, state Attorney General Henry McMaster worked with the General Assembly to fund criminal domestic violence prosecutors. As this force takes shape in 2007, a team of established pro bono attorneys are helping prosecute cases at the first-offense magistrate level.

"Ranking No. 7 in the nation in something so hideous, as domestic violence is a terrible shame for South Carolina," said Mark Plowden, spokesman for McMaster.

Criminal domestic violence is the worst criminal problem facing the state, Plowden said. "Moving down a spot from No. 6 is encouraging, but more a glaring reminder that much, much more work must be done in this state," he said.

McMaster is expected to release 2006 figures on male and female victims killed by domestic violence at the 10th annual Silent Witness ceremony Oct. 1 in Columbia. Those numbers will be used by the Violence Policy Center for its next study.

Rainey, who is majoring in computer science at Southern University, works 40 hours a week at a Wal-Mart tire and lube service department to pay for his education.

"I wanted to come home, but I'm in school, and it's hard to come home," he said by phone from Baton Rouge.

When people gather at the steps of the Statehouse in Columbia to honor those killed by domestic violence last year, Rainey will hold a lone vigil in Louisiana.

With his compass gone, he doesn't know where home is. "I don't know where I'm happier at. I love being in Charleston ... but it's hard being there because you know something's missing."


4. S.C. domestic violence deaths soar

Associated Press
Tuesday, October 2, 2007


COLUMBIA — The number of domestic violence deaths in South Carolina in 2006 was nearly double compared with the previous year.

The 50 victims were being remembered in an annual ceremony at the Statehouse. Family members and friends held up life-sized silhouettes that represent each victim.

One silhouette also was held up to represent unknown or unreported victims of domestic violence.

Officials say the 10 men and 40 women killed by their partners in 2005 is up from 32 domestic violence deaths in 2005.

A national study released last week ranked South Carolina as seventh in the nation based on population in the number of women killed by men during 2005.

A Story of Hope and Survival.......





Natalie Rock, 14, has been singing since she was four-years-old.


She has sung at church, has performed the national anthem at various Flat Rock Middle School events and even performed at the Blind Horse Saloon at age 11.


But now the Saluda resident will be singing at a whole other level. Rock will be auditioning for NBC's hit television show "America's Got Talent" in February.


The Charlotte audition is one that Natalie and her mother, Gina Freeman, have been trying to land for the last year.


Now three applications later, Rock will be singing in front of the judges panel that includes international sensation David Hasselhoff, Sharon Osbourne and British tabloid star Piers Morgan. The show is hosted by Jerry Springer.


"I'm hoping they will like me," Rock said. "I'm not really that nervous. I'm just happy."


For Natalie, however, singing is more than just a hobby.


It's a mechanism for survival.


Natalie, her mom and siblings are all survivors of domestic violence.




"She was always singing," Freeman said. "That's what got her through it. As a family, we're trying to show that you don't lay down and take it."


And then there's the Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) that she had when she was four-weeks-old.


Rock spent 15 weeks in an ICU while living in Waynesville. She stopped breathing twice.


Her mother didn't know where to turn so she called five different churches, hoping that prayer would save her baby's life.


"She's lived through it and now she's a beautiful 14-year-old with an amazing voice," Freeman said.


And as Natalie got older, Freeman could tell that she was drawn to God and the church. It's the motivation behind her desire to sing and be a performer.


"God's given me a talent and I'm going to use it," she said.


She's been using it her entire life. She's surrounded by a family of musicians and singers. Her mom and younger sister, Mariah, play instruments. Her older brothers Alex and Adam play and sing. Her stepfather Steven Freeman plays drums.


"My whole family's about music and that's helped me a lot," Natalie said.


But no matter what happens, Freeman said, she'll be a proud mother when her daughter sings in front of the judges in February.


"I'm proud of her regardless," her mother said. "We were hoping that one day a door will open for her. We don't know if this is it or not, but how often do you get to sing in front of the 'America's Got Talent' judges?"


This is the third season of "America's Got Talent." Rock has a few songs in mind to sing for the audition that include country star Sarah Evans's "Suds in the Bucket" and pop star Christina Aguilera's "Hurt."


Joey Millwood
Sports Editor
Tryon Daily Bulletin
828-859-2737, ext. 110
fax: 828-859-5575

Domestic violence court in session

All I have to say to this is AMEN! and WOOHOO! We are finally geting somewhere in this state! This is one county down and how many to go? LOL! Actually I don't know if there are other counties in NC doing this already but they all need to, as well as counties across the US!

Beginning Jan. 1, all domestic violence cases -- criminal and civil -- were moved to the same docket and will be heard in the same courtroom by the same four judges, said District Judge Amy Sigmon, who helped orchestrate the new system.

Charlotte Observer 01/24/2008 Domestic violence court in session

January 23, 2008

Bill introduced into Indiana State Legislature would prevent a person who murdered his or her spouse from profiting from the death

Killer's Settlement Claim Catches Lawmaker's Attention
Daughter's Suicide Let Man Collect Money; Proposal Would Stop Other Such Cases

INDIANAPOLIS -- Because a man who killed his wife successfully claimed some money her family won in a related lawsuit, a state lawmaker is proposing a law that would prevent such claims in the future. The bill introduced by state Rep. Dennis Tyler, D-Muncie, would prevent a person who murdered his or her spouse from profiting from the death, Tyler said.
"There will no longer be any loopholes for them to profit from it," Tyler said.

The bill stems from the claim made by Tommy Ross, who was convicted in 1995 of killing his wife Paula Ross in Gaston in October 1994. Police said Paula Ross had just dropped off one of their daughters at Wes-Del Elementary School when Tommy Ross, whom she had divorced just one day earlier, shot her. Tommy Ross was sentenced to 60 years in prison and is serving his sentence in the Pendleton Correctional Facility.

In the late 1990s, a judge ruled the Gaston Police Department didn't do enough to protect Paula Ross, so her parents and two daughters were awarded a financial settlement from the city.
In 2005, Tommy and Paula Ross' oldest daughter committed suicide, opening the door for Tommy Ross to claim part of the daughter's estate, which includes money awarded in the settlement. "(Tommy Ross) put his children in a terrible position where they have to be raised without their mother or their father, and then comes back and wants a share of the child's estate," said Jack Quirk, an attorney for Paula Ross' family. In a statement given to WRTV-6News, Juanell Arbogast, Paula Ross' mother, said: "The fact that he and his attorneys benefited from his horrific crime is something no family should have to witness."

Tyler's bill is expected to clear the state House, Carmack reported. Tommy Ross is expected to be released from prison in October 2023.

POSTED: 11:53 pm EST January 22, 2008
UPDATED: 1:12 pm EST January 23, 2008

January 22, 2008

The Guilt of the Abused - Pathologizing the Victim by Sam Vaknin

This article gives very good insight into why and how DV Victims are further victimized by nearly everyone they come in contact with after their abuse. This is a long read but packed with many truths, and well worth the time. You will see that you are not alone, you are not going crazy, and will know that there are those out there that do "get it". You will also see why this feels like such an up hill battle to you and why most of the "good" people in society will either ignore your plight or make matters worse even when attempting to help. Please use this information as a means to pull yourself up from the "norm" to re-educate yourself and then to start re-educating those around you; in order to grow and heal!

The Guilt of the Abused - Pathologizing the Victim

January 14, 2008

Indiana Bill on Joint Legal Custody
Introduced by State Reps. Pond, Lawson L, Noe, Cherry

House Bill 1205
2008 Regular Session


DIGEST OF INTRODUCED BILL
Joint legal custody. Establishes a rebuttable presumption that an award of joint legal custody is in the best interest of a child. Requires a court, if a party seeks to rebut the presumption, to consider: (1) the fitness and suitability of each of the persons awarded joint legal custody; (2) the ability of the parents to communicate and advance the child's welfare; and (3) whether the child has established a close and beneficial relationship with both of the persons awarded joint legal custody. Repeals a provision containing language that is relocated within the Indiana Code. Repeals provisions that provide that a: (1) mother of a child born out of wedlock has sole legal custody of the child; and (2) custodial parent may determine the child's upbringing.

Even with passage of this bill, it will be hard to hold certain courts in this state to this statute. Courts do not always follow state code, and no matter how well meaning the state legislature is, state code has to have more teeth to it to make a parents rights and custody more equal and fair to all the parties, because in the end, it is what is right for the children involved!

January 8, 2008

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, accused

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "W

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a collong off period," said Arnold

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a rep

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying to look at this in a different light."


Arnold introduced his legisl

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying to look at this in a different light."


Arnold introduced his legislation after meeting with the LaPorte County Domestic Violence Task Force, whose members were concerned that accused abusers were leaving jail too quickly. His bill as been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee.


Jean Russell, vice president of programs at the Center for Women and Families, which serves Southern Indiana and Louisville, KY

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying to look at this in a different light."


Arnold introduced his legislation after meeting with the LaPorte County Domestic Violence Task Force, whose members were concerned that accused abusers were leaving jail too quickly. His bill as been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee.


Jean Russell, vice president of programs at the Center for Women and Families, which serves Southern Indiana and Louisville, KY, called the Indiana proposal encouraging. She said Kentucky does not mandate a cooling off period. "It's a beginning first step that is help

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying to look at this in a different light."


Arnold introduced his legislation after meeting with the LaPorte County Domestic Violence Task Force, whose members were concerned that accused abusers were leaving jail too quickly. His bill as been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee.


Jean Russell, vice president of programs at the Center for Women and Families, which serves Southern Indiana and Louisville, KY, called the Indiana proposal encouraging. She said Kentucky does not mandate a cooling off period. "It's a beginning first step that is helpful," she said. "But it's not nece

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying to look at this in a different light."


Arnold introduced his legislation after meeting with the LaPorte County Domestic Violence Task Force, whose members were concerned that accused abusers were leaving jail too quickly. His bill as been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee.


Jean Russell, vice president of programs at the Center for Women and Families, which serves Southern Indiana and Louisville, KY, called the Indiana proposal encouraging. She said Kentucky does not mandate a cooling off period. "It's a beginning first step that is helpful," she said. "But it's not necessarily by itself going to be the solution."


Although there's no statewide requirement

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying to look at this in a different light."


Arnold introduced his legislation after meeting with the LaPorte County Domestic Violence Task Force, whose members were concerned that accused abusers were leaving jail too quickly. His bill as been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee.


Jean Russell, vice president of programs at the Center for Women and Families, which serves Southern Indiana and Louisville, KY, called the Indiana proposal encouraging. She said Kentucky does not mandate a cooling off period. "It's a beginning first step that is helpful," she said. "But it's not necessarily by itself going to be the solution."


Although there's no statewide requirement for a cooling off period for accused batterers, some Indiana judges already impose similar restrictions. "There's county-by-county discres

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying to look at this in a different light."


Arnold introduced his legislation after meeting with the LaPorte County Domestic Violence Task Force, whose members were concerned that accused abusers were leaving jail too quickly. His bill as been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee.


Jean Russell, vice president of programs at the Center for Women and Families, which serves Southern Indiana and Louisville, KY, called the Indiana proposal encouraging. She said Kentucky does not mandate a cooling off period. "It's a beginning first step that is helpful," she said. "But it's not necessarily by itself going to be the solution."


Although there's no statewide requirement for a cooling off period for accused batterers, some Indiana judges already impose similar restrictions. "There's county-by-county discre

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.


Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying to look at this in a different light."


Arnold introduced his legislation after meeting with the LaPorte County Domestic Violence Task Force, whose members were concerned that accused abusers were leaving jail too quickly. His bill as been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee.


Jean Russell, vice president of programs at the Center for Women and Families, which serves Southern Indiana and Louisville, KY, called the Indiana proposal encouraging. She said Kentucky does not mandate a cooling off period. "It's a beginning first step that is helpful," she said. "But it's not necessarily by itself going to be the solution."


Although there's no statewide requirement for a cooling off period for accused batterers, some Indiana judges already impose similar restrictions. "There's county-by-county discretion," said Barb Miller, executive director of the Albion Fellows Bacon Center, an Evansville-based organization that serves domestic violence victims in eleven counties. "You can be arrested and be bonded out in a manner of a couple hours" in Vanderburgh County, Miller said. She said that's often not enough time for victims to locate help, pack their belongings and get their children to a safe location, adding that "time is so critical" for victims.

Accused batterers in Indiana may face "cool off" period

As reported in the Indianapolis Star (byline Associated Press) on December 26th, 2007, accused batterers may face "cool off" period. People accused of abuse in domestic violence cases would have to spend at least eight hours in jail to "cool off" under a bill sponsored by an Indiana lawmaker.

Sen. Jim Arnold, D-LaPorte, said his bill would give victims time to find help or go to shelters while their alleged abusers are in jail. "We're calling it a cooling off period," said Arnold, a former two-term sheriff. "Right now, we have too many officers going back to these situations on a repetitive basis. So we're trying to look at this in a different light."

Arnold introduced his legislation after meeting with the LaPorte County Domestic Violence Task Force, whose members were concerned that accused abusers were leaving jail too quickly. His bill as been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Jean Russell, vice president of programs at the Center for Women and Families, which serves Southern Indiana and Louisville, KY, called the Indiana proposal encouraging. She said Kentucky does not mandate a cooling off period. "It's a beginning first step that is helpful," she said. "But it's not necessarily by itself going to be the solution."

Although there's no statewide requirement for a cooling off period for accused batterers, some Indiana judges already impose similar restrictions. "There's county-by-county discretion," said Barb Miller, executive director of the Albion Fellows Bacon Center, an Evansville-based organization that serves domestic violence victims in eleven counties. "You can be arrested and be bonded out in a manner of a couple hours" in Vanderburgh County, Miller said. She said that's often not enough time for victims to locate help, pack their belongings and get their children to a safe location, adding that "time is so critical" for victims.